Courses

CodeX faculty, staff and fellows offer courses on the rapidly changing field of legal technology. The following is a list courses that have been offered by CodeX affiliates:

Legal Informatics

**LAW 729/CS 204 – Spring Quarter 2015 – Thursdays, 2:00p-4:00p
Prof. Michael Genesereth, Instructor
Dr. Roland Vogl, Instructor

Legal Informatics

**LAW 729/CS 204 – Spring Quarter 2014 – Thursdays, 2:00p-4:00p
Prof. Michael Genesereth, Instructor
Dr. Roland Vogl, Instructor
Briane Chanelle Cornish, Teaching Assistant

The History and Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence

**CS 22 – Fall Quarter 2013 – Tuesdays & Wednesdays, 1:15p- 2:05p
Jerry Kaplan, PhD, Instructor
Nick Dufour, Course Assistant
Julie Fortuna, Course Assistant

Legal Technology & Informatics Class

https://beta.lawgives.com/communities/legal-technology-class
Stanford Law School
**LAW 668 – Fall Quarter 2012 – Wednesday, 4:15p- 6:15p
Ron Dolin, JD, PhD, Instructor
Tony Lai, MA (Oxon), LL.M, Research Fellow
Pieter Gunst, LL.M., Research Fellow

Computers and Law

Stanford CS Department
Prof. Michael Genesereth, Instructor

Code=Law

Stanford Law School
Seminar Spring Quarter 2012 – Tuesday, 7:00p – 9:00p
Pieter Gunst, LL.M., Instructor

Legal Informatics Class Spring 2015 – Law 729/CS 204

robot at the table

Legal Informatics – Law 729/CS 204
Thursdays 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Stanford Law School, Room 320D

The management of information is crucial to the proper functioning of any legal system.  A good legal system relies on information about the world itself (such as evidence of who did what and when) as well as more purely legal information (such as court rulings, statutes, contracts, and so forth). Legal Informatics is the theory and practice of managing such information.  It covers both legal theory and information theory. It also covers elements of general information processing technology as well as applications of that technology in the administration of law. While the concept of Legal Informatics is not new, its importance is greater than ever due to recent technological advances – including progress on mechanized legal information processing, the growth of the Internet, and the proliferation of autonomous systems (such as self-driving cars and robots), as well as globalization of the legal industry. The upshot of these advances is the emergence of practical legal technology that is qualitatively superior to what has gone before.  This technology is capable of dramatically changing the legal profession, improving the quality and efficiency of legal services and disrupting the way law firms do business.  The technology is also capable of popularizing the law – bringing legal understanding and legal tools to everyone in society, not just legal professionals.

Through this class students gain an understanding of the unique challenges and opportunities the legal system and the legal industry are facing in light of this tech-driven transformation of our legal system, and learn about innovative new approaches seeking to address them. Students will be introduced to technologies that are commonly used for legal research, as well as document management by law firms and corporate legal departments. Students will also be familiarized with the next generation of innovative systems and platforms that challenge the way law has been practiced to date, but also promise to increase the efficiency of our legal system.

Class Modules
  1. Legal Document Management (including legal research technology, legal document services)
  2. Legal Practice Management (including: lawyer marketplaces, managing the legal business process, legal process outsourcing, and virtual law practice), and
  3. Computational Law (including: legal expert systems, computable contracts, open data, big data law, unauthorized practice of law issues and access to justice).
Guest Speakers

Expert guest-speakers from academia and industry will provide for a diverse and interdisciplinary experience. Successful legal technology entrepreneurs and thought leaders in the legal technology space will provide a practical angle to the discussion, including:

  • Pablo Arredondo, Casetext; CodeX/li>
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  • Tony Lai, Founder, LawGives; CodeX
  • Pieter Gunst, Founder, LawGives; CodeX
  • Professor Oliver Goodenough, Vermont Law School; CodeX/li>
  • Professor Phil Malone, Stanford Law School
  • Jay Mandal, Optimizely
  • Professor Dan Siciliano, Stanford Law School
  • Professor Harry Surden, University of Colorado; CodeX
  • Professor George Triantis, Stanford Law School
  • Joshua Walker, Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP; CodeX
Course Information

Instructors:
Professor Michael Genesereth
Stanford Computer Science Department, Stanford Law School (by courtesy); Research Director, CodeX – The Stanford Center for Legal Informatics (http://codex.stanford.edu)
genesereth@cs.stanford.edu
Office: Gates Computer Science Department, Room 220

Dr. Roland Vogl
Lecturer in Law, Stanford Law School; Executive Director, CodeX – The Stanford Center for Legal Informatics (http://codex.stanford.edu)
rvogl@law.stanford.edu
Office: Law School Crown, Room 366

Contact: Please email rvogl@law.stanford.edu for all questions.
Prerequisites: There are no prerequisites for this class. All interested students are welcome.

Syllabus

1. LEGAL DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT

Meeting 1 (April 2, 2015): Class Introduction and Overview

  • Roland Vogl, CodeX; SLS
  • Prof. Michael Genesereth, CodeX; CS

Legal Research: People, Patterns, and Progress

  • Speaker: Pablo Arredondo, Casetext; CodeX fellow

Meeting 2 (April 9, 2015): Legal Document Management and the Consumer Law Revolution
The “Latent Demand” for Legal Services

  • Speaker: Eddie Hartmann, Co-founder, LegalZoom

2. Legal Infrastructure

Meeting 3 (April 16, 2015): Legal Practice Management I – New Ways to Find and Connect with Lawyers
New Marketplaces for Lawyers; Virtual Law Practice; Law Firm in a Box

  • Speakers: Tony Lai & Pieter Gunst, LawGives

Meeting 4 (April 23, 2015) Legal Practice Management II – Re-envisioning Legal Services as a Business Process
Six Sigma for Law Firms,..

  • Speaker: Professor Dan Siciliano, SLS; CodeX

Meeting 5 (April 30, 2015): CodeX FutureLaw Conference

  • Registration is free for Legal Informatics students
  • Attendance of entire conference is not required, but attendance of the panels during our normal class time counts as class attendance (either of the 3 breakout sessions and the Legal Technology in the Service of Human Rights Session).

3. Computational Law

Meeting 6 (May 7, 2015): An Introduction to Computational Law
From the Early Origins of AI & Law to Expert Systems, Turbotax, Embedded Law and Enterprise Management Systems based on Logical Spreadsheets

Meeting 7 (May 14, 2015): Computable Contracts and the Future of Transactional Practice: Modularity and Contract Design

Meeting 8 (May 21, 2015): Big Data Law
Machine Learning and Law; Predictive Coding; Big Data Analytics

Meeting 9 (May 28, 2015): Legal Ethics – What It Means to Practice Law, the ABA and the Unauthorized Practice of Law Rules; Access to Justice

Legal Informatics Class – Spring 2014, Law 729/CS 204

IS THIS YOUR FUTURE PARTNER?

Computer technology has transformed the nature of work in industry after industry. Is the legal profession next?

So far, its impact has been mostly limited to the storage and processing of documents, but that’s about to change. Contracts will be drafted by artificially intelligent systems. Autonomous cars will download and obey updated traffic regulations. Proposed legislation will be automatically vetted for logical consistency with current law. What role will lawyers play when customized advice is dispensed over the internet as easily as cappuccino from a vending machine?

Vocational training for the future practice of law starts now, with Legal Informatics (Law 729, CS 204), a new course cross-listed at the Law School and the Computer Science Department. Law 729 examines technologies for making the law, lawyers and legal institutions more accessible, efficient and transparent. Topics covered with include: Legal research technology; Big data law; The consumer law revolution; Law as a business process; Legal lead generation; Access to justice; Computational law and computable contracts; Legal ethics and legal expert systems.

For video-captures of the class sessions, please visiting our Youtube channel here

Guest Speakers

The course featured guest lectures from some of the country’s leading experts from academia and industry, including:

  • Paul Lomio, Stanford Law School Head Librarian & Lecturer in Law
  • Jake Heller & Pablo Arredondo, Casetext
  • Josh Becker, CEO, LexMachina
  • Prof. Dan Katz, Michigan State University School of Law
  • Jay Mandal, RocketLawyer
  • Raj Abhyanker, Chairman, LegalForce/Trademarkia
  • Prof. Dan Siciliano, Stanford Law School
  • Richard Granat, CEO, LawMediaLabs, Inc.
  • Alma Asay, CEO, Allegory Law
  • Bonnie Rose Hough, Managing Attorney, Center for Families, Children & the Courts; Judicial and Court Operations Services Division
  • Prof. Phil Malone, Stanford Law School
  • Prof. Bart Verheij, CodeX – The Stanford Center for Legal Informatics; University of Groningen
  • Ajay Agrawal, CEO SirionLabs
  • Harm Bavinck, CodeX – The Stanford Center for Legal Informatics; CEO, Effacts
Course Information:

Instructors: Prof. Michael Genesereth (Stanford CS Department & SLS), Dr. Roland Vogl (SLS)
Teaching assistant: Briane Chanelle Cornish
Contact: Please email rvogl@law.stanford.edu for all questions.
Prerequisites: None. All interested students are welcome.

Course Description

The legal system is undergoing rapid change due to – among other forces – expanding use of information technology in legal services as well as globalization of the legal industry.
This class offers an overview of how technology is used in today’s legal practice and how it will be changing the landscape of the legal profession and the law more broadly in the foreseeable future. Through this class students gain an understanding of the unique challenges and opportunities the legal system and the legal industry are facing and learn about innovative new systems seeking to address them. Students will be introduced to technologies that are commonly used for legal research, as well as matter management and client management. Students will be familiarized with the next generation of innovative systems and platforms that challenge the way law has been practiced to date, but also promise to increase the efficiency of and access to our legal system.

Class Modules
  • Legal Document Management (including electronic legal research, e-discovery, specialized legal databases)
  • Legal Infrastructure (including case management, client management, legal lead generation, managing the legal business process, legal process outsourcing, and virtual law practice), and
  • Computational Law (including legal expert systems, computable contracts, and unauthorized practice of law issues).
Preliminary Syllabus

MODULE 1 – LEGAL DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT

Meeting 1 (April 3, 2014): Legal Research Technology – The Past, the Present and the Future; Accessing Legal Source Materials
Session Leader: Paul Lomio, Stanford Law Head Librarian

Speakers: Jake Heller & Pablo Arredondo, Casetext

Meeting 2 (April 10, 2014): Big Data Law – Specialized Legal Databases and E-discovery Systems and their Impact on the Practice of Law in Law Firms as well as In-house
Session Leader: Josh Becker, CEO, LexMachina

Speaker: Prof. Dan Katz, Michigan State University School of Law

Meeting 3 (April 17, 2014): The Consumer Law Revolution – How to Make Money from the “Latent Demand” for Legal Services.
Session Leader: Roland Vogl, SLS

Speaker: Jay Mandal, RocketLawyer

MODULE 2 – LEGAL INFRASTRUCTURE

Meeting 4 (April 24, 2014): The New Avenues for Finding Your Clients – Innovative Legal Lead Generation Platforms
Speaker: Raj Abhyanker, Chairman, LegalForce/Trademarkia

Meeting 5 (May 1, 2014): The Law As A Business Process – Managing the Firm’s Back-office; The Current Infrastructure for Managing your Matter (firm vs. in-house perspective); Virtual Law Practice; Legal Process Outsourcing
Session Leader: Richard Granat, Co-Chair ABA Elawyering Task Force; CEO/LawMediaLabs, Inc.

Speakers:
Alma Asay, CEO, Allegory Law
Michelle Sonu, SLS Clinics

Meeting 6 (May 8, 2014): Legal Technology and Access to Justice Products and their Limitations
Speaker: Bonnie Rose Hough, Managing Attorney, Center for Families, Children & the Courts; Judicial and Court Operations Services Division

MODULE 3 – COMPUTATIONAL LAW AND ACCESS TO JUSTICE

Meeting 7 (May 15, 2014): From the Early Origins of AI & Law to Turbotax, Embedded Law and Enterprise Management Systems based on Logical Spreadsheets – An Introduction to Computational Law
Session Leader: Prof. Michael Genesereth, CS & SLS (by courtesy)

Meeting 8 (May 22, 2014): Computable Contracts and the Future of Transactional Practice
Speakers:
Prof. Harry Surden, University of Colorado
Ajay Agrawal, CEO, SirionLabs
Harm Bavinck, CEO, Effacts

Meeting 9 (May 29, 2014): Legal Ethics, Legal Expert Systems and What It Means to Practice Law; the ABA and Unauthorized Practice of Law Rules.
Speakers:
Marc Lauritsen, Capstone Practice Systems
Tony Lai, CEO, LawGives
Pieter Gunst, COO, LawGives