Hear from our Fellows

Eduardo Ferrer Mac-Gregor

Eduardo Ferrer Mac-Gregor

Eduardo Ferrer Mac-Gregor is Judge of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, as well as a Senior Researcher-Professor in the Legal Research Institute (Instituto de Investigaciones Jurídicas) of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). He is an expert in Mexican constitutional law and constitutional procedure, international law, and human rights law. While at Stanford, he analyzed the right to truth, and the justiciability of social, economic and cultural rights in the Inter-American System of Human Rights, as well as the ways in which a “judicial human rights dialogue” between national and international courts can have an impact in the protection of human rights.

Q: What is your current affiliation and the area of your expertise/scholarship?

I am a Judge of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights, and a Senior Researcher-Professor in the Legal Research Institute (Instituto de Investigaciones Jurídicas) of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). My area of expertise is Constitutional and Procedural Law, Human Rights and International Law.

Q: What were you working on as a visiting fellow at the Stanford Human Rights Center?

The right to the truth, and the justiciability of social, economic and cultural rights in the Inter-American System of Human Rights. I also studied the different types and impact of the judicial dialogue in human rights, between national and international courts.

Q: Can you give us an impression of your interaction with the Stanford community? What did you like best about your time at Stanford?

The Human Rights Center and the International Human Rights and Conflicts Resolution Clinic are great places to do research, as well as to exchange ideas with professors, students and scholars about different human rights issues. I was really impressed by the Robert Crown Law Library, especially with the friendly staff that helped me to find everything I needed for my research project.

Q: What advice would you give to students who are interested in pursuing a career in human rights?

It is important to realize that human rights is part of everyone’s life. To be aware of social justice, poverty and economic, social and cultural rights. A career in this area is full of satisfactions and multidisciplinary challenges and there is a wide range of opportunities in government and international agencies, NGO’s, United Nations, international litigation, private or public advising, teaching, researching, and so on.

Ayako Nakamura

Ayako Nakamura

Ayako Nakamura is Assistant Professor for International Relations at Tohoku University’s Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Science. She researches human rights and human trafficking in East Asia and Europe and is interested in the mechanisms of diffusing and internalising anti-trafficking norms around the world and the role of regional organisations and civil society actors. She has conducted extensive field work with policy makers and civil society actors in Europe and East Asia. She is currently a Visiting Scholar at Stanford Human Rights Center where she is conducting a comparative analysis of the processes of capacity building and network building in Europe and Asia.

Q: What is your current affiliation and the area of your expertise?

I am assistant professor of international relations at the Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences at Tohoku University, Japan. My research focuses on the role of regional organizations in the crafting and proliferation of anti-trafficking norms in Europe and East Asia.

Q: What were you working on as a visiting fellow at the Stanford Human Rights Center?

During my time as visiting fellow at the Stanford Human Rights Center I conducted research on anti-trafficking governance in Northeast Asia and Europe. Established literature on Northeast Asian regionalism mainly focuses on traditional security or economic dynamics as the main force behind regional cooperation. Filling the gap of non-traditional security issues in this scholarship, my research focused on government and civil society responses to human trafficking of women and children for sexual exploitation.

This issue has become particular important as economic and social cross-border activities have drastically altered the dynamics of regionalization and regionalism in Northeast Asia. Since the 1990s, regional governments have debated and implemented a number of policy measures against human trafficking. Cross-border cooperation between police agencies has been facilitated, while new national and transnational networks between civil society actors and governments have emerged. Against this background, I have analyzed how anti-trafficking cooperation is ‘securitized’ in Northeast Asia.

The key questions shaping my research are as follows: How have regional states implemented anti-trafficking norms? How does the nature of state-society relations affect processes of securitization and norm diffusion? By looking at Japanese, Korean, and Chinese government responses I have tried to illustrate new mechanisms of regionalism and network building at the domestic and inter-state levels.

Q: Can you give us an impression of your interaction with the Stanford community? What did you like best about your time at Stanford?

I particularly enjoyed the excellent environment at Stanford which not only provided space for and access to exciting research, but with its many workshops and symposia it also provided many opportunities to develop new ideas. Meeting interesting scholars from various backgrounds in academia and civil society activism from the U.S. and other parts of the world has also provided me with new input for my own research.

Q: What advice would you give to students who are interested in pursuing a career in human rights?

Use Stanford’s multicultural and interdisciplinary environment through dialogue with scholars and students from different academic disciplines and nationalities to expand your academic horizon.

Aida Díaz-Tendero Bollain

aida-diaz-tendero-bollain

Aida Díaz-Tendero Bollain is an expert in sociology of aging in Latin America and the Caribbean. She is a Researcher-Professor at the Latin American and Caribbean Research Center (CIALC) of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). While at Stanford, her research focused on human rights of the elderly.

Q: What is your current affiliation and the area of your expertise?

I am Researcher-Professor at the Latin American and the Caribbean Research Center (CIALC) of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM). My area of expertise is the Sociology of Aging in Latin America and the Caribbean

Q: What were you working on as a visiting fellow at the Stanford Human Rights Center?

Human rights of the elderly.

Q: Can you give us an impression of your interaction with the Stanford community? What did you like best about your time at Stanford?

First of all, I was amazed by the beauty of the campus and the dedication everybody displays in their work. The people that work at the libraries, as well as the professors, researchers, and the staff are all very inspiring people, with a genuine interest on what is going on in different parts of the world. I would say it is quite an ideal space for researching, as it must be for teaching and studying.

Q: What advice would you give to students who are interested in pursuing a career in human rights?

Be aware of the political-economical perspective, the sociodemographic aspects and the local history and culture in which human rights issues play out.