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Data: Privacy, Property and Security

Future Offerings

Data: Privacy, Property and Security (4046): The collection, use and marketing of personal data are ubiquitous in the digital age. This seminar will explore the diverse legal regimes regulating personal data--including privacy, property and security--and the imperfect nature of their protections. Legal rules are rapidly evolving to address, if not resolve, the inevitable conflicts between privacy, property and security in relation to personal data. Laws have been enacted and new ones are under consideration at the national, state and even municipal levels, as well as around the world. Norms are emerging to guide these conflicts in the operation of business. Technology is evolving that can facilitate the protection, or accelerate the exploitation, of personal data. At the heart of all these developments is the question, who owns and controls personal data in the digital age. The same piece of data may in different hands raise different expectations. As an example, A may have a privacy expectation that her purchase from an online marketplace is no one's business but her own. B, the app that served as intermediary between the buyer and seller, may have a property or contract expectation that it owns the metadata and other information about A's buying habits. C, a government agency, may have a security interest in collecting or unearthing the details of A's purchase of particular items. This same triad of interests is implicated across a wide variety of highly sensitive personal data, such as location information, facial recognition and medical results. This seminar will explore these data rules, norms, technologies and conflicts through three sessions of lecture and interactive exercises addressed to privacy, property and security, respectively; four sessions devoted to presentations from leading representatives of consumer, corporate and government interests, with questioning by students in the class; and two sessions devoted to discussion of student answers to problem sets, focusing on an exploration of the privacy-property-security conflict and on forward-looking solutions to the protection of personal data. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, research papers. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available at https://law.stanford.edu/education/courses/consent-of-instructor-forms/. See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with International Policy (INTLPOL 362).

Sections

Data: Privacy, Property and Security | LAW 4046 Section 01 Class #31553

  • 3 Units
  • Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
  • Enrollment Limitations: Consent 16
  • Learning Outcomes Addressed:
    • LO1 - Substantive and Procedural Law
    • LO2 - Legal Analysis and Reasoning
    • LO3 - Ability to Conduct Legal Research
    • LO4 - Ability to Communicate Effectively in Writing
  • Course Category:
    • Intellectual Property & Technology

Notes: Cross-listed with International Policy (INTLPOL 362).

  • 2022-2023 Spring ( )
  • Mon

Past Offerings

Data: Privacy, Property and Security (4046): The collection, use and marketing of personal data are ubiquitous in the digital age. This seminar will explore the diverse legal regimes regulating personal data--including privacy, property and security--and the imperfect nature of their protections. Legal rules are rapidly evolving to address, if not resolve, the inevitable conflicts between privacy, property and security in relation to personal data. Laws have been enacted and new ones are under consideration at the national, state and even municipal levels, as well as around the world. Norms are emerging to guide these conflicts in the operation of business. Technology is evolving that can facilitate the protection, or accelerate the exploitation, of personal data. At the heart of all these developments is the question, who owns and controls personal data in the digital age. The same piece of data may in different hands raise different expectations. As an example, A may have a privacy expectation that her purchase from an online marketplace is no one's business but her own. B, the app that served as intermediary between the buyer and seller, may have a property or contract expectation that it owns the metadata and other information about A's buying habits. C, a government agency, may have a security interest in collecting or unearthing the details of A's purchase of particular items. This same triad of interests is implicated across a wide variety of highly sensitive personal data, such as location information, facial recognition and medical results. This seminar will explore these data rules, norms, technologies and conflicts through three sessions of lecture and interactive exercises addressed to privacy, property and security, respectively; four sessions devoted to presentations from leading representatives of consumer, corporate and government interests, with questioning by students in the class; and two sessions devoted to discussion of student answers to problem sets, focusing on an exploration of the privacy-property-security conflict and on forward-looking solutions to the protection of personal data. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, research papers. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available at https://law.stanford.edu/education/courses/consent-of-instructor-forms/. See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with International Policy (INTLPOL 362).

Sections

Data: Privacy, Property and Security | LAW 4046 Section 01 Class #1070

  • 3 Units
  • Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
  • 2021-2022 Winter
    Schedule No Longer Available
  • Enrollment Limitations: Consent 16
    • 1L: Winter Elective (Open to First-Year JD Students)
  • Learning Outcomes Addressed:
    • LO1 - Substantive and Procedural Law
    • LO2 - Legal Analysis and Reasoning
    • LO3 - Ability to Conduct Legal Research
    • LO4 - Ability to Communicate Effectively in Writing
  • Course Category:
    • Intellectual Property & Technology

Notes: Cross-listed with International Policy (INTLPOL 362).

  • 2021-2022 Winter
    Schedule No Longer Available

Data: Privacy, Property and Security (4046): The collection, use and marketing of personal data are ubiquitous in the digital age. This seminar will explore the diverse legal regimes regulating personal data--including privacy, property and security--and the imperfect nature of their protections. Legal rules are rapidly evolving to address, if not resolve, the inevitable conflicts between privacy, property and security in relation to personal data. Laws have been enacted and new ones are under consideration at the national, state and even municipal levels, as well as around the world. Norms are emerging to guide these conflicts in the operation of business. Technology is evolving that can facilitate the protection, or accelerate the exploitation, of personal data. At the heart of all these developments is the question, who owns and controls personal data in the digital age. The same piece of data may in different hands raise different expectations. As an example, A may have a privacy expectation that her purchase from an online marketplace is no one's business but her own. B, the app that served as intermediary between the buyer and seller, may have a property or contract expectation that it owns the metadata and other information about A's buying habits. C, a government agency, may have a security interest in collecting or unearthing the details of A's purchase of particular items. This same triad of interests is implicated across a wide variety of highly sensitive personal data, such as location information, facial recognition and medical results. This seminar will explore these data rules, norms, technologies and conflicts through three sessions of lecture and interactive exercises addressed to privacy, property and security, respectively; four sessions devoted to presentations from leading representatives of consumer, corporate and government interests, with questioning by students in the class; and two sessions devoted to discussion of student answers to problem sets, focusing on an exploration of the privacy-property-security conflict and on forward-looking solutions to the protection of personal data. Elements used in grading: Attendance, class participation, research papers. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline. Cross-listed with International Policy (INTLPOL 362).

Sections

Data: Privacy, Property and Security | LAW 4046 Section 01 Class #1072

  • 3 Units
  • Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
  • 2020-2021 Winter
    Schedule No Longer Available
  • Enrollment Limitations: Consent 16
    • 1L: Winter Elective (Open to First-Year JD Students)
  • Learning Outcomes Addressed:
    • LO1 - Substantive and Procedural Law
    • LO2 - Legal Analysis and Reasoning
    • LO3 - Ability to Conduct Legal Research
    • LO4 - Ability to Communicate Effectively in Writing
  • Course Category:
    • Intellectual Property & Technology

Notes: Cross-listed with International Policy (INTLPOL 362).

  • 2020-2021 Winter
    Schedule No Longer Available
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