Policy Practicum: Justice By Design: Eviction

Past Offerings

Policy Practicum: Justice By Design: Eviction (806Y): Client: NAACP, https://naacp.org/. Three out of five people in civil cases have no lawyer, but are often navigating issues with profound legal importance to their lives. At the same time, the courts are trying to manage a massive volume of cases, with particularly large numbers of cases concerning housing and eviction. What are the new policies & services that can prevent evictions effectively, and promote housing stability? This policy practicum will partner students with the NAACP, which is developing new eviction prevention pilots. Students will work on designing and evaluating new eviction pilots, including on how to get more community education around housing law, housing navigators to support people through the court process, and collaborative housing court models to promote better outcomes. We will work with interviews, observations, data-gathering, and workshops to understand how eviction cases work and what outcomes result. Students will map out opportunities for pilots and plan for how they can be evaluated. This class is part of a multi-year partnership to redesign the civil justice system so that it works better for all litigants, especially those without a lawyer. Students will learn how to do design research, facilitate multi-stakeholder system redesign, and envision a government innovation process. Their work will directly feed into future classes, pilots, and studies into how to make housing court more efficient, accessible, and just. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available at https://law.stanford.edu/education/courses/consent-of-instructor-forms/. See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.

Sections

Policy Practicum: Justice By Design: Eviction | LAW 806Y Section 01 Class #32945

  • 3 Units
  • Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
  • 2021-2022 Winter
    Schedule No Longer Available
  • Enrollment Limitations: Consent 16
    • 1L: Winter Elective (Open to First-Year JD Students)
  • Graduation Requirements:
    • PW-Professional Writing Requirement for Law Degree
  • Learning Outcomes Addressed:
    • LO1 - Substantive and Procedural Law
    • LO3 - Ability to Conduct Legal Research
    • LO4 - Ability to Communicate Effectively in Writing
    • LO5 - Ability to Communicate Orally
    • LO6 - Law Governing Lawyers/Ethical Responsibilities
    • LO7 - Professional Skills

  • 2021-2022 Winter
    Schedule No Longer Available

Policy Practicum: Justice By Design: Eviction (806Y): Client: NAACP, https://naacp.org/. Three out of five people in civil cases have no lawyer, but are often navigating issues with profound legal importance to their lives. At the same time, the courts are trying to manage a massive volume of cases, with particularly large numbers of cases concerning housing and eviction. What are the new policies & services that can prevent evictions effectively, and promote housing stability? This policy practicum will partner students with the NAACP, which is developing new eviction prevention pilots. Students will work on designing and evaluating new eviction pilots, including on how to get more community education around housing law, housing navigators to support people through the court process, and collaborative housing court models to promote better outcomes. We will work with interviews, observations, data-gathering, and workshops to understand how eviction cases work and what outcomes result. Students will map out opportunities for pilots and plan for how they can be evaluated. This class is part of a multi-year partnership to redesign the civil justice system so that it works better for all litigants, especially those without a lawyer. Students will learn how to do design research, facilitate multi-stakeholder system redesign, and envision a government innovation process. Their work will directly feed into future classes, pilots, and studies into how to make housing court more efficient, accessible, and just. Elements used in grading: Attendance, Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments, Final Paper. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available at https://law.stanford.edu/education/courses/consent-of-instructor-forms/. See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.

Sections

Policy Practicum: Justice By Design: Eviction | LAW 806Y Section 01 Class #42636

  • 3 Units
  • Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
  • 2021-2022 Autumn
    Schedule No Longer Available
  • Enrollment Limitations: Consent 16
  • Graduation Requirements:
    • PW-Professional Writing Requirement for Law Degree
  • Learning Outcomes Addressed:
    • LO1 - Substantive and Procedural Law
    • LO3 - Ability to Conduct Legal Research
    • LO4 - Ability to Communicate Effectively in Writing
    • LO5 - Ability to Communicate Orally
    • LO6 - Law Governing Lawyers/Ethical Responsibilities
    • LO7 - Professional Skills

  • 2021-2022 Autumn
    Schedule No Longer Available

Policy Practicum: Justice By Design: Eviction (806Y): Client: NAACP, https://www.naacp.org/, Tenants Together, https://www.tenantstogether.org/. Justice By Design will examine how changes in the operation of housing courts are responding to the 'new normal' era of COVID-19, which has disproportionately affected communities of color. Even before the pandemic, research showed that black and brown people, especially black women, face substantially higher eviction rates than other demographic groups. The economic hardships of the past year threaten to raise these rates even higher. At the same time, there is a new openness to innovation in the courts, with virtual hearings, community navigators, and eviction diversion programs. The racial equity movement following the killing of George Floyd has also pushed court leaders to a moment of change and reflection. Many court justices and administrators have expressed an interest in making courts more accessible and equitable. This class will use this opportunity to bring policymakers and judicial administrators together with community members -- especially from the demographic groups most likely to face eviction -- to improve how housing courts work, and to propose new initiatives to prevent evictions. Students will work directly with the NAACP and other partner organizations, which are developing new models for eviction diversion and prevention. The research teams will tackle specific policy challenges, including how to broaden a community's awareness of rights and services; how court rules and procedures might be reformed to allow for meaningful participation; and adaptations in the format for hearings and mediations that enable equal access to all. During the class, students will hear challenges from judicial leaders and housing advocates; conduct user research and design sessions with tenants and landlords; and propose new models of how landlord-tenant issues can be resolved in court hearings or diversion programs. A particular focus will be on programs that can work virtually, and on making these programs accessible and engaging for people from demographic groups most at risk of eviction. The final deliverable will be a proposed initiative for our partners to implement, along with an evaluation plan to measure its impact. It will include a written proposal and analysis, a visual presentation, and a public presentation to policy-makers around the country. The students¿ learning goals are to understand how the housing and eviction system works, including the legal procedures, rights, and sociological dynamics of how this system interrelates with poverty and community stability. Students will also develop policy analysis and design skills grounded in qualitative and quantitative approaches. Students will expand their understanding of how to analyze complex social systems which will, in turn, contribute to new skills in facilitating discussions and collaborating with community members and policymakers to design new policy interventions and programs. This policy lab invites applications from law students and from graduate and upper-class students across the university who are engaged in coursework focused on public policy and social problem solving, especially housing justice. Knowledge of the housing court system is beneficial but not required. The application is available at https://registrar.law.stanford.edu/. Elements used in grading: Attendance Performance, Class Participation, Written Assignments. CONSENT APPLICATION: To apply for this course, students must complete and submit a Consent Application Form available on the SLS website (Click Courses at the bottom of the homepage and then click Consent of Instructor Forms). See Consent Application Form for instructions and submission deadline.

Sections

Policy Practicum: Justice By Design: Eviction | LAW 806Y Section 01 Class #34128

  • 2 3 Units
  • Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
  • 2020-2021 Spring
    Schedule No Longer Available
  • Enrollment Limitations: Consent 16
  • Learning Outcomes Addressed:
    • LO4 - Ability to Communicate Effectively in Writing
    • LO5 - Ability to Communicate Orally
    • LO6 - Law Governing Lawyers/Ethical Responsibilities
    • LO7 - Professional Skills

  • 2020-2021 Spring
    Schedule No Longer Available

Policy Practicum: Justice By Design: Eviction | LAW 806Y Section 02 Class #34129

  • 3 Units
  • Grading: Law Honors/Pass/Restrd Cr/Fail
  • 2020-2021 Spring
    Schedule No Longer Available
  • Enrollment Limitations: Consent
  • Graduation Requirements:
    • PW-Professional Writing Requirement for Law Degree
  • Learning Outcomes Addressed:
    • LO4 - Ability to Communicate Effectively in Writing
    • LO5 - Ability to Communicate Orally
    • LO6 - Law Governing Lawyers/Ethical Responsibilities
    • LO7 - Professional Skills

  • 2020-2021 Spring
    Schedule No Longer Available
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