Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows

Please see our Public Interest Fellows page for more information about this program.

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 15


Sophie Allen
Sophie grew up in Maryland and attended college at Cornell University where she received her B.S. in Industrial and Labor Relations. Before law school, she worked an investigator at Brooklyn Defender Services. She has served on the boards of the Stanford Prisoner Advocacy and Resources Coalition (SPARC) and the Criminal Law Society. Sophie also helps lead a graduate student wide program called the Stanford Prison Education Project (SPEP). Sophie spent her 1L summer at Nashville Defenders and will spend her 2L summer at Stanford working on her PhD in sociology. She enjoys baking, watching reality television, and being outside.

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Tanner Allread
Tanner grew up in Union City, Oklahoma, a small rural town outside of Oklahoma City. In 2016, he graduated from Yale University, where he majored in History and received a certificate in Education Studies. After graduation, Tanner returned to Oklahoma as aTeach for America corps member, spending two years as a middle school science teacher in Oklahoma City. At SLS, Tanner has been the Co-President of the Native American Law Students Association, a co-founder and moderator for Critical Conversations for 1Ls, an active member of OutLaw, and involved in various groups pushing for more progressive and public-interest-oriented activities at the law school. He is also a Ph.D. in History student at Stanford. Tanner intends to pursue a career in Federal Indian Law and spent his 1L summer at Kanji & Katzen, a firm in Seattle, Washington, that represents tribes across the country. He spent his 2L summer at the Office of the Tribal Attorney for the Yurok Tribe in Klamath, California. In his free time, he loves to travel with his partner, Josh, read, and hang out with his Goldendoodle, Rey.

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Bree Baccaglini
Bree Baccaglini grew up in San Francisco, CA, and graduated from Middlebury College in 2015 with a BA in Political Science and Arabic. Before law school, Bree spent three years dabbling in different social justice and public interest pursuits. She worked in human rights advocacy at the Open Society Foundations in D.C. and then relocated to Ohio to join the Clinton campaign as a field organizer in 2016. In 2017, she moved to Beirut, Lebanon, where she worked as a contractor for the Canadian Embassy coordinating a civil society grant program and volunteered for the International Refugee Assistance Project doing Arabic-language intake interviews with Syrian and Iraqi refugees seeking resettlement. At SLS, Bree has been involved in SLA, WSL, and CRCL, and was a clinical student with the Community Law Clinic. She spent her 1L summer at the Campaign Legal Center in D.C.—an impact litigation non-profit focused on voting rights and democracy law. Her 2L summer, she worked as a law clerk with the Civil Rights and Community Lawyering of the Oakland City Attorney’s Office. After graduation, Bree hopes to work in civil legal aid in her hometown of San Francisco.

Class of 2020 Public Interest Fellows 4


Nitisha Baronia
Nitisha grew up in the Bay Area, where she studied business and political science at the University of California, Berkeley. After graduating, she spent time researching sexual violence along the Central American migration route with the Berkeley Law Human Rights Center. She also spent sometime in the private sector, working as a private equity analyst. Nitisha joined Stanford as a Knight-Hennessy scholar pursuing a joint degree in law and public policy. During her time on campus, she has served as co-President of the Middle Eastern and South Asian Law Students Association and the American Constitution Society, and as a board member for the Asian and Pacific Islander Law Students Association. She also served as the Senior Articles Editor on the Stanford Law Review. Nitisha is interested in international human rights, domestic civil rights, and criminal justice reform. During her 1L summer, she worked in California state government, first interning with the criminal appeals section at the California Department of Justice, and then completing a judicial externship with Justice Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar of the California Supreme Court. During her 2L summer, Nitisha served as a WilmerHale Payton Fellow, working first at the firm and then at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, primarily on voting rights litigation. After clerking on the First Circuit and the District Court for the District of Columbia, Nitisha hopes to kick off a public interest career in civil rights litigation or in government, either at the state or federal level.

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Sarah Beller
Sarah grew up in London and San Francisco. She studied Classics and Computer Science in undergrad and was a proud member of the Leland Stanford Junior University Marching Band. She tried out the East Coast for a few years as a software engineer before returning to the Best Coast to try to stop mass surveillance. At SLS, Sarah was Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, is an Articles Editor on Stanford Law Review, and is involved with the American Constitution Society (ACS). She spent her 1L summer at the ACLU of Northern California on their Technology & Civil Liberties team. She spent her 2L summer at the Alaska Public Defender up by the Arctic Circle (talk to her about it, she thinks it’s the best possible 2L summer!). After graduating, Sarah will clerk for Judge David Carter in the Central District of California and then become a public defender. In her free time, Sarah loves hiking, cooking, and doing the New York Times crossword puzzle.

Class of 2020 Public Interest Fellows 5


Cam Clevidence
Cam is passionate about increasing access to clean water and addressing water scarcity amidst climate change. Prior to law school, Cam spent 4 years as a community organizer working on agricultural and environmental policy in Montana andCalifornia. He spent his 1L summer at the California Attorney General Natural Resources section, and his 2L summer with NRDC. After graduating, Cam is heading home to clerk for Chief Judge Brian Morris in Great Falls, Montana.

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Brett Diehl
Brett is a 3L interested in criminal justice, Latin America, and the (great) outdoors. He spent 1L summer at the San Francisco Public Defender’s Office and 2L summer at the Contra Costa Public Defender’s Office. Perhaps not surprisingly, he hopes for a career in criminal defense.

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Taylor Evensen
Taylor grew up in Pasadena, California and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 2016 with a double major in History and Hispanic Studies. She earned her master’s degree in Modern European History at the University of Oxford in 2018. At SLS, Taylor has been a co-founder of the Stanford COVID Pro Bono Project, an articles editor of the Stanford Law Review, symposium editor of the Stanford Journal of International Law, co-president of the Stanford Advocates for Immigrants’ Rights, and a member of the Immigrants’ Rights Clinic. She has also volunteered with organizations like Al Otro Lado and Proyecto Dilley. She spent her summers with the Prisoners’ Rights Project at the Legal Aid Society of New York and Legal Aid At Work’s National Origin and Immigrants’ Rights Program. Taylor is currently externing with the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project.

Class of 2020 Public Interest Fellows 7


Jason Fernandes
Jason was born and raised in Pennsylvania. He studied Cognitive Science at the University of Pennsylvania, then worked for a year at a website design startup based in New York and Kuala Lumpur. He then spent two years as an editor at a think tank in Washington, D.C., where he also led organizing efforts for their staff union. He came to law school to help create a more democratic economy. In his 1L summer, he worked at the Sustainable Economies Law Center, where he provided transactional legal services to cooperatives and helped create a new type of easement designed to permanently remove homes from the speculative market. This past summer, he worked at a PPI firm that represents labor unions. Jason loves sports, board games, small dogs, and speculative fiction.

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 12


Evie Freeman
Evie was born and raised in Baltimore. She graduated from Yale in 2014 where she studied Political Science. After college, she moved to Santa Fe to complete a one-year fellowship as a Legislative Assistant at the New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs. She moved back east to intern at the Obama White House for the Council on Women and Girls, and then she worked at the U.S. Department of JusticeOffice on Violence Against Women until the end of the Obama Administration. The incredibly effective and productive lawyers at OVW inspired her to apply to law school. She deferred for a year to work for the Obama Foundation. Evie spent her 1L summer back in Washington working for the Democratic staff of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform writing legislation and investigating agency abuses, including workplace harassment. She continued with the Committee as an extern for 2L Fall Quarter. This past summer, Evie interned with the National Women’s Law Center on the Income Security and Child Care team. After law school, she hopes to return to Capitol Hill.

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Ryan Gallagher
Ryan was born and raised in Sacramento, California. He traveled east of the Mississippi River for the first time in his life to attend Dartmouth College, where he joined the running club and drew comics for the student newspaper. After graduating in 2016 with a B.A. in environmental studies and government, he returned to Sacramento to work in environmental consulting. At SLS, Ryan is a co-coordinator of the Environmental Law Pro Bono Project, a co-editor-in-chief of the Environmental Law Journal, and a board member of the Environmental Law Society. He has also participated in the Environmental Law Clinic as both a full-time and an advanced student. He spent his 1L summer in the California Department of Justice’s Sacramento offices working in the environment, land law, and natural resources sections, and his 2L summer clerking (virtually) at Shute, Mihaly & Weinberger in San Francisco. After law school, Ryan will clerk on the Ninth Circuit for the Honorable Sidney Thomas. In his free time, Ryan enjoys fly fishing and tree hugging.

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Rachel Glanz
Rachel grew up outside of Boston, Massachusetts and graduated from Duke University in 2016. She returned to Boston after college to work for the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation, a nonprofit that funds civil legal aid agencies and advocates for more state funding of legal aid. While in law school, Rachel has interned at the East Bay Community Law Center’s housing unit, the Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence, and the San Francisco Public Defender’s Office. She will clerk on the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court after graduating and hopes to start her legal career at a public defender’s office.

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Elena Goldstein
Elena was born and raised in San Francisco.  She spent six formative winters on the East Coast—four in New York as a disciplinarily undisciplined Columbia student, two in Boston on staff at Harvard’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society.  Elena hopes to situate her career at the intersection of law, technology, and civil rights, focusing on some combination of consumer protection, competition, speech, and labor issues.  As a law student, she spent summer months living her dreams with the ACLU of Northern California’s Technology & Civil Liberties team and the Office of Commissioner Rebecca Kelly Slaughter at the Federal Trade Commission.  Since she found this far more enlightening than the case method, Elena also externed with Legal Aid at Work and (soon) the California Attorney General’s Privacy Enforcement & Protection  Unit.  Elena failed to shift the burden of financing her legal education to Stanford despite serving as a Teaching Assistant or Research Assistant almost every quarter in the Law School or Computer Science Department.  She was also Co-Director of the Workers’ Rights Pro Bono Project, Co-Chair of the Stanford Technology Law Review’s Articles Committee, and Co-President of the Stanford Law and Technology Association and Stanford AI and Law Society.  After graduation, Elena will clerk on the Fifth Circuit for Judge Carl Stewart and in the Northern District of California for Judge William Alsup.

Class of 2020 Public Interest Fellows 9


Katherine Gwyn
Katherine grew up in Everett, Washington and graduated from the University of Washington where she majored in Political Science and Communication. At SLS, she has been involved in the Community Law Clinic, Project Clean Slate, Shaking the Foundations Conference, and the Stanford Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties. Katherine has spent her summers with the San Mateo County Counsel’s Office and Washington Attorney General. She is excited to return to the Pacific Northwest after graduation.

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows


Connor Hayes
Connor grew up in Pittsburgh, PA, and will happily talk anyone’s ear off about the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. He graduated from the University of Notre Dame in 2016 with majors and minors in Political Science, International Peace Studies, and Gender Studies; during his time in undergrad, he helped co-found the first official LGBTQ student organization at Notre Dame. After college, he spent a year as an AmeriCorps volunteer with Jesuit Volunteer Corps Northwest in Portland, Oregon, where he worked at a drop-in center for low-income folks living with HIV. He then spent a year working on Congressman Conor Lamb’s campaign in the southern suburbs of Pittsburgh. At SLS, Connor has served as co-editor in chief of the Stanford Journal of Civil Rights & Civil Liberties, co-president of OutLaw, is involved with the Community Law Clinic and the Housing Pro Bono Project. He spent his 1L summer externing with Judge Felipe Restrepo on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit in Philadelphia, and split his 2L summer between Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll, a D.C.-based plaintiffs’ class action firm, and the ACLU of Pennsylvania. He plans to return to Philly after law school. In his free time, Connor spends a bit too much time reading cookbooks instead of casebooks, hiking in the Santa Cruz mountains, and searching for the best ice cream in the Bay Area.


Dan Huddleston

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Jeremy Hutton
Jeremy is a 3L from Santa Barbara, California. He graduated from Yale University with a bachelor’s degree in economics. He intends to apply his law degree toward rectifying inequalities associated with criminal justice and wealth distribution. He spent his 1L summer as a Fair and Just Prosecution Summer Fellow with the St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office. He split his 2L summer between the St. Louis County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office and Munger, Tolles & Olson. Prior to Stanford, he worked at J.P. Morgan as a sales and trading associate in Interest Rate Derivatives and was an active member on the junior board of the rehabilitation and crime prevention program, Avenues for Justice. At Stanford, Jeremy has served as the Membership Chair for the American Constitution Society, Treasurer of the Criminal Law Society, and Co-President of the Stanford Entertainment and Sports Law Association. He was a member of the Prosecution Clinic in Winter 2020 and will be a Teaching Assistant for Trial Advocacy in Fall 2020. In his free time, Jeremy loves to scuba dive, read Abraham Lincoln biographies, and play basketball with the Stanford Club Basketball team.

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Joseph Ingrao
Joe is from Maryland, and studied Engineering and Anthropology at Lafayette College. Between college and law school, Joe worked as a farmhand, interned for the ACLU of Maryland, worked as a legislative assistant in the Maryland General Assembly and as an advocacy intern at Free State Justice. Joe is interested in Environmental Justice, civil rights and civil liberties law, local and state government work, and environmental conservation generally. In his first summer, he worked for the California Attorney General’s office in the Environment and Land Law Sections, and in his second summer he worked at EarthJustice in San Francisco while volunteering on the side for the ACLU of San Diego and Imperial Counties. As a 2L, Joe was a board member of the National Lawyers Guild and the Environmental Law Society, was a Technical Managing Editor for the Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, and participated in the Naturalization Pro Bono. This year Joe will be an academic chair for ACS and a Production Editor for the Law & Policy Review. Joe is also pursuing a Masters through the Emmett-Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources (E-IPER). In his spare time, Joe goes to the gym, bikes, and fences.

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Erika Inwald
Erika A. Inwald is from Brooklyn, New York. She is passionate about fair labor, sustainable food and agriculture, and a just immigration system. Erika graduated from Brown University with a bachelor’s degree in environmental studies and from New York University with a master’s degree in food policy. Before law school she was a 21st Class Bill Emerson National Hunger Fellow with the Congressional Hunger Center. As a fellow, she helped coordinate the distribution of fresh fruits and vegetables to food pantries and hot meal programs in Chicago, IL and advocated for food sovereignty, progressive trade agreements, and the Right to Water in Washington, D.C. Additionally, Erika served as the National Coordinator of the Domestic Fair Trade Association. At SLS, Erika has argued three times as a student attorney with the Environmental Law Clinic, is a notes editor of the Stanford Law Review, was treasurer of the Black Law Students Association, and led the Workers’ Rights Pro Bono Project. Erika has also volunteered with immigrants’ rights organizations such as Al Otro Lado and The Florence Project. During her summers, Erika has helped litigate numerous plaintiff-side class action cases, and after graduation, she will be clerking for Judge Ivan Lemelle in the Eastern District of Louisiana-New Orleans. For fun, Erika likes to dance to Reggaetón and cook spicy food.

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 1


Cody Kahoe
Cody Kahoe grew up in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. After graduating from Yale University in 2015 with a B.A. in Modern Middle East Studies, he spent a year in Istanbul, Turkey conducting research and interviews on the Grand Bazaar. Cody began working in the Bay Area legal world as a legal assistant at Sanford Heisler Sharp, LLP in San Francisco, a plaintiff-side employment law firm that specializes in discrimination and wage and hour claims. At SLS, Cody has been an Executive Editor of the Stanford Law Review, a co-director of the Workers’ Rights Pro Bono Project, an Articles Editor on the Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL), a Programming Director for the Shaking the Foundations progressive lawyering conference, and a member of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic. During his law school summers, Cody has worked at Altshuler Berzon LLP and the Oakland City Attorney’s Office, Community Lawyering and Civil Rights Unit. After graduation, Cody will clerk for Judge Marsha S. Berzon of the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and for Judge Christopher R. Cooper of the District of the District of Columbia. In his free time, Cody enjoys hiking, baking, highly-amateur guitar playing, and the N.Y. Times crossword (but not Friday or Saturday puzzles).

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A.D. Lewis
A.D. is from Texas, and he studied politics and viola performance at Oberlin College & Conservatory. After college, he worked in government oversight (City of Chicago Office of Inspector General) and in police misconduct investigations (Civilian Office of Police Accountability). At SLS, A.D. has been co-president of OutLaw, Stanford Prisoner Advocacy & Resource Coalition, and Law Students for Disability Rights. He is an Articles Editor on Stanford Law Review and a Special Issue Editor on Stanford Civil Rights & Civil Liberties Review. He co-founded Critical Conversations (tinyurl.com/sls-crit-convos) and the TGI Pro Bono Project. During Law School, he’s worked at Disability Rights Washington, East Bay Community Law Center, Stanford’s Community Law Clinic, and TGI Justice Project.

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Diana Li
Diana is a proud New Yorker who was born and raised in Brooklyn (about a mile from where RBG grew up!). She graduated from Yale in 2015 with a degree in Ethics, Politics, and Economics. Before law school, Diana was a consultant with the Boston Consulting Group and then a project manager at the International Rescue Committee, an NGO that aids and resettles refugees. At SLS, Diana co-leads the Stanford Public Interest Law Foundation, Moot Court Board, the Housing Pro Bono, and First Person Storytelling, and is Senior Notes Editor of the Stanford Law Review. As a 2L, she participated in the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic, and she is very excited to join the Three Strikes Project this coming fall. She spent her 1L summer at the New York Legal Assistance Group working on class action lawsuits and her 2L summer at Gupta Wessler working on plaintiff-side appellate litigation. After graduating, she will return to the East Coast—where her poor driving abilities will thankfully no longer be an issue—where she will be clerking for Judge Garland on the D.C. Circuit and then Judge Oetken in the Southern District of New York.

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Andrew Lubash
Andrew grew up in Beaverton, Oregon and attended the University of Oregon where he studied political science and economics. Before coming to Stanford, he worked as a paralegal at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and on the staff of the Harry S. Truman Scholarship Foundation. At Stanford, Andrew has been involved with the Economic Advancement Pro Bono, the Community Law Clinic, OutLaw, and is on the Articles Committee of theStanford Law Review. He spent his 1L summer working at the New York Attorney General’s Consumer Fraud and Protection Division and his 2L summer with Stanford’s Supreme Court Litigation Clinic. Andrew is currently externing with the Consumer Federation of America, a DC-based consumer advocacy nonprofit. He hopes to pursue a career in financial regulation and consumer protection issues.

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 3

Reed McLaurin
Reed grew up in Lufkin, Texas, a small town in the Piney Woods of Deep East Texas. In 2018, he graduated from Duke University, where he studied public policy, cultural anthropology, and ethics. During his undergrad, Reed worked with Durham community members experiencing homelessness and poverty to secure housing, government services, and financial independence. At Stanford, Reed is involved with the Naturalization Pro Bono, OutLaw, and the National Lawyers Guild. He spent his 1L summer at Bay Area Legal Aid’s San Francisco office, working in their housing unit. There Reed worked to defend public housing tenants and other low-income clients facing eviction. For his 2L summer, Reed (virtually) participated in housing policy work and technical assistance at the National Housing Law Project’s San Francisco office. His work focused on protecting tenants’ rights in HUD-run programs like the Housing Choice Voucher program. Outside of SLS, Reed is an avid music fan, tennis/squash player, and photography lover. He intends to pursue tenant defense in New York City after graduation.  

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 4


Benjy Mercer-Golden
Benjy grew up in Berkeley, California and London, England. He graduated from Stanford in 2015 with a degree in history. Before law school, he worked on political campaigns and traveled to as many places as he could. During law school, Benjy has focused on indigent criminal defense work. He spent his 1L summer at the San Francisco Public Defender’s Office and his 2L summer at the Alameda County Public Defender’s Office. He also participated in the Criminal Defense Clinic and the Three Strikes Project and will extern this year at the Federal Public Defender for the Northern District of California. At SLS, Benjy served as Co-President of the American Constitution Society and the Stanford Law Democrats, Senior Editor of the Stanford Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, and Programming Chair of the Criminal Law Society and Stanford Prisoner Advocacy & Resources Coalition. He also has done pro bono work with Prisoner Legal Services. After graduation, he will clerk forJ udge Jesus Bernal in the Central District of California and hopes to work in public defense. In his free time, Benjy enjoys nature, travel, music, reading and sleeping.

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Lisa Muloma
Lisa Muloma is a 3L interested in federal indigent defense and litigation on behalf of prisoners (and honestly a wide variety of other things, most of them having to do with incarcerated folks). While at SLS, Lisa has been co-president of the Criminal Law Society, the Black Law Students Association, the Naturalization Pro Bono, and First Person. She also co-led the In Custody Programming component of the Stanford Prisoner Advocacy and Resources Coalition. In her free time, Lisa enjoys snacking, writing creatively, sitting in aesthetically pleasing beer gardens and coffee shops, reading short stories, and staying up late talking about important things and unimportant things. 

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 5


Shawn Musgrave
Shawn grew up in Tucson, Arizona, and came to SLS after working for several years as an investigative reporter. He graduated from Boston University in 2012 and completed a data reporting certificate at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism in 2014. Shawn has developed a specialty in complex requests for government documents and data, and his work has appeared in Politico, the Boston Globe, The Intercept, Motherboard, The Verge, and Reason magazine, among other outlets. At SLS, Shawn is a member of the Stanford Public Interest Law Foundation, Older Wiser Law Students (OWLS), the SLS Musical, Outlaw, the Stanford Journal of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, and the Election Law Project. He spent his 1L summer as a legal intern at the Center for Investigative Reporting, his 2L year as a legal intern at the Electronic Frontier Foundation and a certified law student in the Stanford Juelsgaard Intellectual Property and Innovation Clinic (JIPIC), and his 2L summer as a summer associate with Sanford Heisler Sharp’s whistleblower practice group. Outside law school, Shawn enjoys cooking, yoga, improv comedy, and traveling with his partner.

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 6


Skylar Ruprecht
Skylar is a rising 3L who has spent both of his law school summers working in public interest. During his 1L summer, he interned at California Rural Legal Assistance and focused primarily on education equity cases. This past summer, he worked at the Federal Defender’s Office for the Eastern District of Virginia in Alexandria. Going forward, he hopes to pursue a career in indigent defense.

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Grace Rybak
Grace grew up in Minneapolis, MN. She graduated from Columbia University in 2013 with a degree in Political Science. Prior to law school, Grace worked as an elementary school teacher for five years in Minneapolis and Guadalajara, Mexico. At Stanford, Grace has participated in Supreme Court Litigation Clinic, the Election Law Project, the Immigration Pro Bono Project, and the Stanford Law and Policy Review. She spent the first half of her 1L summer working at MALDEF in San Antonio, and the second half working for Judge Susan Richard Nelson in the District of Minnesota. During her 2L summer, Grace was a summer associate at Altshuler Berzon in San Francisco, where she worked primarily on labor law and employment discrimination cases. After graduation, she looks forward to clerking for Judge Gwin in the Northern District of Ohio and Judge Pillard on the D.C. Circuit.

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 8


Hannah Schwarz
Hailing from Chapel Hill, NC, Hannah graduated from Yale in 2016. Before law school, she worked as a newspaper reporter in Upstate New York, where she covered local government and politics. This past summer, she interned at the ACLU National Prison Project, working on COVID-19 class actions to get people out of prison, and at the MacArthur Justice Center, where she helped prepare for a trial on the Chicago Police Department’s unconstitutional investigation methods. Last summer, she worked in the Civil Rights Bureau of the New York Attorney General’s Office. At Stanford, she served as academic co-chair of Women of Stanford Law (WSL), co-vice president of the Jewish Law Students Association (JLSA), articles editor on the Stanford Journal on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, and a member of the Housing Pro Bono Project. In her free time this summer, she alternated between watching Sims 4 speed build videos and listening to folklore.

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Lauren Shepard
Lauren is a Bay Area native, and graduated from University of Michigan with a degree in political science in 2017. While in college, Lauren worked as a research assistant for a Michigan Law professor, ran art workshops at the local county jail, and interned for the ACLU National Prison Project. Lauren loved living in Ann Arbor so much that she stayed there for a year after undergrad, working as a law clerk at Michigan Immigrant Rights Center on a team representing unaccompanied minors in deportation proceedings. At SLS, Lauren has been an Articles Editor of the Stanford Law Review, a co-manager of the Shaking the Foundations progressive lawyering conference, an executive board member for Stanford Advocates for Immigrants’ Rights, and a member of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic. She also has participated in the Prisoner Legal Services pro bono project. She spent her 1L summer at the ACLU Immigrants’ Rights Project in San Francisco and her 2L summer at Civil Rights Corps in Washington, D.C. After graduation, Lauren will join the Santa Clara County Counsel as a 2021-2023 Social Justice and Impact Litigation Fellow. In her free time, Lauren enjoys hiking, swimming, and board games.

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 9


Noelle Smith
Noelle grew up in Dallas, Texas. In 2016, she graduated from Davidson College where she studied Political Science and Hispanic Studies. Before law school, she spent a year teaching English in Chetumal, Mexico. Following her work in Mexico, Noelle returned to the U.S. and settled in San Francisco where she taught first and second graders. At SLS, Noelle has co-directed the Workers’ Rights Pro Bono and the Social Security Disability Pro Bono Project. She is also involved in Women of Stanford Law and Stanford Law Review. Noelle spent her 1L summer at Legal Aid at Work in San Francisco. While at LAAW, she worked with the Community Legal Services program and the Disability Rights Program. Noelle spent her 2L summer with Lieff Cabraser, a plaintiff-side firm, where she was lucky to work on an antitrust case against the bail bonds industry in California. She also externed with ACLU Immigrants’ Rights Project during her 2L spring. Noelle hopes to return to immigrants’ rights work after clerking for Judge Parrish on the District of Utah and Judge Nguyen on the Ninth Circuit after graduation. When she’s not at school, Noelle loves to spend time hiking and backpacking in the Sierras.

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 16


Jennifer Teitell
Jenn grew up in Pleasanton, California, and attended UCLA, where she majored in Political Science and minored in Public Policy. Before law school, she worked as a research coordinator at the UCLA Civil Rights Project, are search and policy think tank focused on educational equity. At SLS, she has been involved with Stanford Law Review, the Stanford Public Interest Law Foundation, Moot Court, the Religious Liberty Clinic, the Housing Pro Bono Project, Women of Stanford Law, and the Stanford Law Association. She spent her 1L summer at the California Attorney General’s Office in their Civil Rights Enforcement Section, and she worked for the immigrants’ rights team at the ACLU of Southern California this past summer. After clerking for Judge Gleason of the District of Alaska and Judge Christen of the Ninth Circuit, she hopes to pursue a career in civil rights litigation at a nonprofit or government agency. In her free time, she enjoys backpacking, photography, cooking, and reading fantasy and sci-fi novels.

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 10


Bryan Thomson
Bryan grew up in Boulder, Colorado, and attended Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, where he majored in Government and History. Upon graduation, Bryan worked with DACA, U-Visa, and detained asylum applicants in New Mexico. At Stanford, Bryan is involved with the Social Security and Disability Project (SSDP) and the Stanford Law and Policy Review (SLPR). As a 2L, he led the American Constitution Society (ACS) and National Lawyers Guild (NLG) and was part of the Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic. During his summers, Bryan has worked on employment class-action suits, asylum representation, and updating local food security and climate action plans. He is enrolled in a joint JD-MPA program with the Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs, and is interested in the intersection of law and policy in the immigration and environmental fields. Outside of school, Bryan enjoys exploring our national parks, smothering his food in Hatch green chile, and running.

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 11


Mallorie Urban
Mal grew up on the east coast in a small town in Connecticut, but the west coast stole her heart when she moved to Malibu to attend Pepperdine University, where she studied Sociology and Philosophy. Inspired by the power lawyers possess to give a voice to individuals who are stuck inside an oppressive and racist criminal justice system, she decided to go to law school to become a public defender. She spent her 1L summer with the Federal Public Defender for the Western District of Washington in Seattle, and participated in the Stanford Criminal Defense Clinic her 2L fall. She worked with Public Defender Services in Washington, D.C. for her 2L summer, and hopes to go straight into local public defense work after graduation. Outside of her predominant interest in indigent criminal defense, Mal seeks opportunities to advocate for immigrants’ rights, such as volunteering at organizations like Al Otro Lado in Tijuana. At Stanford, Mal was the former Co-President of Stanford Advocates for Immigrants Rights (SAIR), Mentorship Chair for the Criminal Law Society (CLS), and Treasurer for Stanford’s chapter of the National Lawyers Guild (NLG). She remains involved in each of those student organizations and is also actively involved in the Women of Stanford Law (WSL), First Generation/Low-Income Professionals (FLI), and Outlaw. When not drowning in the tragically beautiful abyss that is law school, Mal can be found running, hiking, cooking, painting, or eating ice cream.

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 24


Nicholas Wallace
Nicholas was born and raised in the beautiful metropolis of Ann Arbor, Michigan. He attended the University of Washington, in Seattle (another beautiful metropolis), where he obtained a Bachelors of Science in Economics in 2010.  While at the UW he served as an economics and accounting tutor in the school’s Instructional Center, an academic support center that promotes the academic achievement of under-represented communities at the University.  After graduating, Nicholas went on to work as a paralegal at Keller Rohrback, a Seattle law-firm that specializes in Plaintiffs’ complex litigation, and later held several positions in journalism, including a stint at a public radio station back in Ann Arbor.  At Stanford, Nicholas is pursuing a joint MS-JD in law and environment and resources through the school’s E-IPER program. He serves as an editor on the Stanford Environmental Law Journal, and as a volunteer on the Housing Pro Bono Project, which represents low-income Bay Area residents in housing disputes.  During his 1L summer, he worked for Kanji & Katzen, a private public interest firm that represents Tribal clients around the country. He spent his 2L summer working for the Natural Resources Defense Council. After graduating, he hopes to go into government or non-profit work in the environmental field. Nicholas enjoys inspecting and collecting maps, and reading hard-copy newspapers—past-times that have led some to question his true age.


Christie Wan

Class of 2021 Public Interest Fellows 19


Phil Wilkinson
Phil is a 3L who grew up in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He took time off during his undergraduate years at Yale to work full-time at Hillary’s 2016 campaign headquarters in Brooklyn on the Latino Vote Team. Between undergrad and law school, he completed an MPhil degree at the University of Cambridge. At Stanford, Phil is a member of the Supreme Court Litigation Clinic and the Global Quarter program as a Franke Fellow. Phil has been on the boards of SLLSA, Outlaw, Stanford Law & Policy Review, and Stanford National Security & the Law Society. He has served Spanish-speaking clients in the Social Security Disability Benefits pro bono and the Tijuana asylum project. Some of his fondest memories at SLS have come from acting in the Musical. During his two summers at SLS, Phil interned at the San Francisco City Attorney’s Office, Skadden Arps Slate Meagher & Flom, and The San Francisco City Supervisor’s Office for District Eight. He will clerk for the Southern District of Florida in Miami in 2022. In his spare time, Phil is an avid cellist, singer, and swimmer.