Careers

An SLS education is a life-shaping experience. An SLS degree is a career-making advantage.

Stanford Law prepares students to go wherever the law leads, around the globe and into any of the countless fields law influences, from economics to the environment, public policy to public interest. We cultivate in our students a passion for innovation and a belief in law as a tool for positive change, whether you’re serving a Fortune 100 corporation, preserving the rights of children, setting legal precedents in privacy protection, launching a company or shaping the law from the bench. When you’re ready to launch your career, Stanford Law offers services and support that make your degree a true door-opener.

Graduates at a Glance

97%


Students placed in jobs within 9 months of graduation

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55 countries, 50 states Locations where SLS graduates can be found

58%


Graduates who take jobs outside California at graduation

$160K

Median starting salary for a class of ‘14 SLS graduate

42


Consecutive years SLS graduates have clerked on the U.S. Supreme Court

Hi-tech

Microsoft, Google, Cisco, eBay, Yahoo!, Qualcomm, Oracle, Genentech — just a few enterprises in which SLS graduates serve or have served as general counsels

85/82

Firms on the Am Law 100, American Lawyer’s definitive ranking of the nation’s largest firms, that employ SLS graduates as partners and attorneys, respectively
Stanford just has an entrepreneurial culture and that gave me the confidence to start a company. That was not something I could have imagined ten years earlier.

Dr. Linda Grais, JD ’93, who added a law degree to her Yale MD, worked for Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, founded a life science company that later went public, and then became a venture capitalist, Stanford Lawyer, Issue 85

SLS Pioneers

Shirley Hufstedler, LLB ‘49

First U.S. Secretary of Education

Sandra Day O’Connor, LLB ‘52 (BA ‘50)

First female appointed to the U.S. Supreme Court

Brooksley Born, JD ‘64

First female president of Stanford Law Review, former chair (1998) Commodity Futures Trading Commission, Profile in Courage Award Winner (John F. Kennedy Library)

Mary B. Cranston, JD ‘75 (BA ‘70)

First female chair of a large national law firm

Denis Hayes, JD ‘85

Leader in preparing for the first Earth Day (April 22, 1970)

Anthony Romero, JD ‘90

First Hispanic and first openly gay leader of the American Civil Liberties Union, first recipient of SLS’s National Public Service Award

Skills, Strategies, Opportunities

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Stanford Law’s Office of Career Services (OCS) helps students master career-planning skills and job search strategies, provides employment information, and offers career-related resources and services. The office facilitates mutually beneficial relationships between employers, faculty and staff, students and alumni in order to meet the dynamic needs of today’s legal workplace.

Students interested in governmental and nonprofit employers should also contact staff of the Levin Center for Public Service and Public Interest Law.

Support for Careers with Public Impact

Stanford Law’s commitment to law that makes a difference includes comprehensive support for students whose ambitions lead them to a career in public service or public interest law. The John and Terry Levin Center for Public Service and Public Interest Law is here to help students take advantage of the many opportunities for public service training and pro bono experience at SLS. The center connects new graduates with career options through symposia and panels, externships and mentorships, job placement advice and long-term career planning. Add Stanford Law’s generous loan forgiveness program (LRAP), and the opportunity for impact is within reach.

connect with the levin center
Office of Career Services 1

Connections for Employers

Stanford Law uses Symplicity's database to house all incoming job postings. Employers may post as many jobs as they'd like, free of charge.

Connect with future SLS graduates by participating in an academic program or hosting an event. The Office of Career Services is available to help. Hiring a first year law student is another great way to reach out to the SLS community; by hiring a 1L, employers gain an ambassador who can share perspective on the firm with 3Ls.